It’s quite possible that some of you are here because of the buzz created around OKRs, or Objectives and Key Results, currently featured in numerous modern team performance tools. However, are OKRs enough to ensure usability? Perhaps. Is it also enough to ensure growth solely based on the successful use of OKRs? Read on and let’s reach that conclusion together.

John Doerr is recognized as the main figure behind this goal-setting approach, and his book  “Measure What Matters  – can certainly be held responsible for all the companies deciding to experiment with OKRs themselves.

Since we fully support these initiatives to the best of our abilities we have also implemented OKRs in the Mirro platform so that other companies can easily adopt them as well.

But first things first Let’s start by breaking down the two main ideas behind OKRs:

OBJECTIVES are:

  • Significant – this aspect is what separates an objective from a task – it will show you where you want to go. If your objective is to merely cross the street, you’ll surely get no further.
  • Action-oriented  – groups or individuals can align with an objective and ideate the means to conquer the feat, the timing, and the specific milestones that pave the road ahead.
  • Inspiring – objectives should represent the directions that the company should always follow, the zenith if you will. Therefore, they should speak to each and every one of your people in order for them to join you on this      

Objectives are the WHAT of our purpose. They bring people together and call for action. A “What” is measured in achieved or not achieved, nothing else really matters. Don’t focus on metrics just yet.

KEY RESULTS are:

  • Specific – the right people for the job will always know if these are up to them, and, subsequently, how they can contribute.
  • Time-bound – key results ensure a certain rhythm and remind people of the bigger picture.
  • Realistic but aggressive – again, an OKR is not a task. A key result should be reachable, but the feeling of achieving it shouldn’t compare to a minor day-to-day accomplishment
  • Measurable – numbers, percentages, growth factors, pin them down here – they belong in key results.

The Key Results show HOW I’m going to get my WHAT done.

As Steve Jobs once (or twice) said, ‘one more  …

Here they are, easily explained. OKRs, made simple and clear.

So, are you now ready to get to work and implement your OKRs to start experimenting with different setups, and reach stretch goals in no-time? Ready to fire up your shiny brand new OKR tool and rock-and-roll?

PLEASE DON’T, not yet! To spare you of an upcoming year of still-unachieved goals and of then ditching a potentially beneficial framework, read on for another couple of minutes.

We got to this point forgetting what might be the most important question thus far: WHY are we doing it?

Before you roll up your sleeves, ask yourself this: what’s your mission, what are your company values? Who and what do you stand for?

The goal is to think OKRsnot only to set and follow – think, feel, and live OKRs.

People adhere to inspiring goals when they live in that reality – don’t break OKRs from culture, from your values, don’t treat them as a standalone initiative.

Associate recognition with completed OKRs – remember that Mirro also links recognition to company values, and goes full circle, so apply that in your day-to-day business as well. Make success as visible and transparent as possible and let it inspire, all by using OKRs.

Setting OKRs top down or bottom, in 3s-or-4s-or-no-more-but-no-less-than(s) is, again, not the case.

Let’s think about  Agile and the different frameworks that fit the mindset. It’s the same with OKRs – they’re also a mindset and they’re better off in a company that sets them true in accordance with its values.

Moreover, they’re a mindset to take home with you and implement even in your private life, while staying true to your very own values.

To conclude, here’s Mirro’s WHY in terms of OKRs: making people perceive their work from a different perspective. One of cohesion. That has always been our WHY.

Setting OKRs top down or bottom, in 3s-or-4s-or-no-more-but-no-less-than(s) is, again, not the talk.

We referred to Agile and different frameworks that fit the mindset. It’s the same with OKRs – they’re a mindset and they’re better off in a company that sets them true to its values. 

They’re a mindset to take home with you and implement in your private life and true to your values. 

Here’s Mirro’s WHY in terms of OKRs: Making people perceive their work from a different perspective. One of cohesion. It’s always been our WHY.